christinafarley:

fashion-by-the-book:

Gilded by Christina L. Farley
Find it here
“We are given moments, and we must choose what to do with them. This is your moment.” 

Oh, I just absolutely adore this! Gilded fashion with style,

christinafarley:

fashion-by-the-book:

Gilded by Christina L. Farley

Find it here

“We are given moments, and we must choose what to do with them. This is your moment.”

Oh, I just absolutely adore this! Gilded fashion with style,

yainterrobang:

Here’s a selection of some of the new YA novels hitting the shelves this week (20th - 26th April). For more on new releases and all things YA lit, visit our website, follow us here and on Twitter, and subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

Fragile Line by Brooklyn Skye
Publisher: Entangled Teen
Release date: April 21st
One minute she’s kissing her boyfriend, the next she’s lost in the woods. Sixteen-year-old Ellie Cox is losing time. When Ellie goes missing for three days, waking up in the apartment of a mysterious guy—a guy who is definitely not her boyfriend, her life starts to spiral out of control.

My Not So Super Sweet Life by Rachel Harris
Publisher: Entangled Teen
Release date: April 21st
Cat Crawford just wants to be normal—or at least as normal as a daughter of Hollywood royalty can be. And it looks like fate is granting her wish. That is, until her prodigal mother reveals on national television that she has something important to tell her daughter…causing a media frenzy.

The Chance You Won’t Return by Annie Cardi
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Release date: April 22nd
When your mom thinks she’s Amelia Earhart, navigating high school, first love, and family secrets is like flying solo without a map. As her mom’s flight plans become more intense, Alex is increasingly worried that Amelia is planning her final flight - the flight from which she never returns.

Deception’s Princess (Deception’s Princess #1) by Esther Friesner
Publisher: Random House
Release date: April 22nd
Maeve, princess of Connacht is her father’s favorite daughter. But once he becomes the High King, powerful men begin to circle—it’s easy to love the girl who brings her husband a kingdom. Yet Maeve is more than a prize to be won, and she’s determined to win the right to decide her own fate.

Don’t Call Me Baby by Gwendolyn Heasley
Publisher: HarperTeen
Release date: April 22nd
Imogene is known only as the girl on her mother’s blog. When a mandatory school project compels Imogene to start her own blog, Imogene is reluctant to expose even more of her life online…until she realizes that the project is the opportunity she’s been waiting for to tell the truth about her life.

The Eighth Day (Eighth Day #1) by Dianne K. Salerni
Publisher: HarperCollins
Release date: April 22nd
When Jax wakes up to a world without any people in it, he learns that he’s in the eighth day—an extra day sandwiched between Wednesday and Thursday. Some people are Transitioners, able to live in all eight days, while others exist only on this special day.

Expiration Day by William Campbell Powell
Publisher: Tor Teen
Release date: April 22nd
Tania Deeley is a human in a world where most children are sophisticated androids manufactured by Oxted Corporation. Driven by the need to understand what sets teknoids apart, Tania begins to seek answers. But on their eighteenth “birthdays,” teknoids must be returned to Oxted—never to be heard from again.

The Hunt (Project Paper Doll #2) by Stacey Kade
Publisher: Disney Hyperion
Release date: April 22nd
Dr. Jacobs, head of GTX, is not the only one hunting for Ariane. Two rival corporations have their sights set on taking down their competition. Permanently. To protect Zane and herself, Ariane needs allies. She needs the other hybrids. The hybrids who are way more alien and a lot less human.

The Inventor’s Secret (The Inventor’s Secret #1) by Andrea Cremer
Publisher: Philomel
Release date: April 22nd
Sixteen-year-old Charlotte and her fellow refugees have scraped out an existence on the edge of Britain’s industrial empire. When a new exile seeks shelter in their camp he brings new dangers with him and secrets about the terrible future that awaits all those who have struggled to live in freedom.

The Last Best Kiss by Claire LaZebnik
Publisher: HarperTeen
Release date: April 22nd
Anna Eliot is tired of worrying about what other people think. After all, that was how she lost the only guy she ever really liked, Finn Westbrook. Now, three years after she broke his heart, the one who got away is back in her life.

Meridian (Arclight #2) by Josin L. McQuien
Publisher: Greenwillow
Release date: April 22nd
Marina thought that she had solved all of the Arclight’s mysteries. She had found her own history—that she was one of the Fade, that she never should have been human. But there is so much more that Marina is just discovering, and dangers that even the Fade fear.

Prisoner of Night and Fog (Prisoner of Night and Fog #1) by Anne Blankman
Publisher: Balzer + Bray
Release date: April 22nd
In 1930s Munich, danger lurks behind dark corners, and secrets are buried deep within the city. But Gretchen Müller, who grew up in the National Socialist Party under the wing of her “uncle” Dolf, has been shielded from that side of society. Uncle Dolf is none other than Adolf Hitler.

She Is Not Invisible by Marcus Sedgwick
Publisher: Roaring Brook Press
Release date: April 22nd
Laureth Peak’s father has taught her to look for recurring events, patterns, and numbers. Her secret: She is blind. But when her father goes missing, Laureth and her 7-year-old brother Benjamin are thrust into a mystery that takes them to New York City where surviving will take all her skill at spotting connections.

Summer State of Mind (Whispering Pines #2) by Jen Calonita
Publisher: Poppy
Release date: April 22nd
Summer has finally arrived and Harper McCallister intends to spend her days at the mall shopping or by the pool at her country club. But after receiving her latest heart-stopping credit card bill, Harper’s parents makes other plans, and ship her off to camp.

TALKER 25 (TALKER 25 #1) by Joshua McCune
Publisher: Greenwillow
Release date: April 22nd
It’s a high school prank gone horribly wrong-sneaking onto the rez to pose next to a sleeping dragon-and now senior Melissa Callahan has become an unsuspecting pawn in a war between Man and Monster, between family and friends and the dragons she has despised her whole life.

Troll Mountain: Episode III by Matthew Reilly
Publisher: Momentum
Release date: April 22nd
Raf’s mission to Troll Mountain is in ruins. Having penetrated the mountain, only to be caught in the act of stealing the fabled elixir, Raf must now face the trolls’ champion in a fight to the death. If he can somehow survive this fight, his mission may not be over.

The Fearless by Emma Pass
Publisher: Random House
Release date: April 24th
Cass remembers the night the Fearless passed through her village. Her father was Altered. Her mother died soon after. All Cass has left is her little brother - and when Jori is snatched by the Fearless and taken to their hellish lair, Cass must risk everything to get him back.

Keep the Faith by Candy Harper
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children’s
Release date: April 24th
Get ready for boy dilemmas, friendship dramas and madcap grannies. Will Faith make up her mind between the gorgeous Finn and the lovely Ethan and manage to get herself a real-life boyfriend? Will Faith’s family learn how to be normal, non-embarrassing people?

Shift by Jeff Povey
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children’s
Release date: April 24th
A motley crew of bickering teens find themselves totally alone in the world after a strange power surge hits their classroom during detention. With no answers as to how the rest of the world has disappeared, the mismatched group is soon facing a bigger nightmare than they could ever imagine.

The Year of the Rat by Clare Furniss
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children’s
Release date: April 24th
The world can tip at any moment… a fact that fifteen-year-old Pearl is all too aware of when her mum dies after giving birth to her baby sister. Told across the year following her mother’s death, Pearl’s story is full of bittersweet humour and heartbreaking honesty.

herreracus:

poetrybomb:

Illustration by Robin Herrera, author of Hope Is a Ferris Wheel.


Emily Dickinson is featured prominently in my book, and there’s also a character (Genny) who likes tattoos. SO…

herreracus:

poetrybomb:

Illustration by Robin Herrera, author of Hope Is a Ferris Wheel.

Emily Dickinson is featured prominently in my book, and there’s also a character (Genny) who likes tattoos. SO…

andimjulie:

Internet! Meet me + kristinraewrites in real life! We will talk! And sign books! And maybe give away some stuff!

sharpegirl:

My finished UK copies came! They look so lovely. I’m obsessed with the inside flaps.

sharpegirl:

My finished UK copies came! They look so lovely. I’m obsessed with the inside flaps.

OneFour KidLit author Jen Malone has started an exciting new venture called The Margin Project! Check it out!

What It Is:
Lots of things are way more fun when shared with a friend, whether it’s videogames played together via remote headsets or TV shows watched while following a Twitter hashtag. But for the most part, reading has remained a solitary activity. Sometimes that’s what’s so great about it. Other times, it would be kind of cool to know exactly what your BFF thought of that scene on page 116, wouldn’t it? 
The Margin Project puts forth an odd notion: that it’s okay to write in books. Not all of them, and definitely not ones that belong to your school or library (unless it’s designated part of The Margin Project, that is), but some of them. Specifically, books that have a bookplate in the front proclaiming “This Book Is Part of The Margin Project.” Then it’s totally okay to write in it. What do you write? Anything that pertains to your thoughts and feelings as you read. You can even doodle a picture- maybe a teardrop if it’s a sad scene or a heart if there’s a line you adore. Just keep it clean and friendly and everyone’s happy! 

How It Works:
Your teacher or librarian can designate books in your classroom or library, or you can choose ones from your personal collection, to be part of The Margin Project by placing the special bookplate in the front of the book (use the free printable template below). Then mark away as you read. When you’re done, share it with a friend. It’s tons of fun to get it back later and see what others had to say as they read. You can each pick a different color pen to write with or use a symbol before each of your comments, if you’re sharing with more than one person. A simple key on the back page (purple pen = Kristen or $ = Sarah) will let every reader know who said what. 

Who It’s For:
The Margin Project is great for classrooms, library reading groups, mother-daughter book clubs, Girl or Boy Scout troops, pen pals, far-flung family members, or close-by family members- basically, anyone you want to share a reading experience with. Or mark up your own book and leave it on a bench for a stranger to find! 

How It Came To Be:
In late 2013, a number of 2014 debut authors began sending advance copies of their books “on tour” via mail to other authors, in order to help spread the word of their upcoming releases. As great as it was to read the printed words, the notes and drawings the writers left on each other’s book as they read were just as much fun! (See some examples to the left.) And it got me thinking. Anything that makes reading even more fun just has to be shared, right? Right! Which is also why it would be great if you’d share snapshots of your own Margin Project experiences on this Pinterest page. See what others are reading and writing and get ideas of your own. 
(via Author Jen Malone Site | MARGIN PROJECT)

OneFour KidLit author Jen Malone has started an exciting new venture called The Margin Project! Check it out!

What It Is:

Lots of things are way more fun when shared with a friend, whether it’s videogames played together via remote headsets or TV shows watched while following a Twitter hashtag. But for the most part, reading has remained a solitary activity. Sometimes that’s what’s so great about it. Other times, it would be kind of cool to know exactly what your BFF thought of that scene on page 116, wouldn’t it?

The Margin Project puts forth an odd notion: that it’s okay to write in books. Not all of them, and definitely not ones that belong to your school or library (unless it’s designated part of The Margin Project, that is), but some of them. Specifically, books that have a bookplate in the front proclaiming “This Book Is Part of The Margin Project.” Then it’s totally okay to write in it. What do you write? Anything that pertains to your thoughts and feelings as you read. You can even doodle a picture- maybe a teardrop if it’s a sad scene or a heart if there’s a line you adore. Just keep it clean and friendly and everyone’s happy! 

How It Works:

Your teacher or librarian can designate books in your classroom or library, or you can choose ones from your personal collection, to be part of The Margin Project by placing the special bookplate in the front of the book (use the free printable template below). Then mark away as you read. When you’re done, share it with a friend. It’s tons of fun to get it back later and see what others had to say as they read. You can each pick a different color pen to write with or use a symbol before each of your comments, if you’re sharing with more than one person. A simple key on the back page (purple pen = Kristen or $ = Sarah) will let every reader know who said what.

Who It’s For:

The Margin Project is great for classrooms, library reading groups, mother-daughter book clubs, Girl or Boy Scout troops, pen pals, far-flung family members, or close-by family members- basically, anyone you want to share a reading experience with. Or mark up your own book and leave it on a bench for a stranger to find!

How It Came To Be:

In late 2013, a number of 2014 debut authors began sending advance copies of their books “on tour” via mail to other authors, in order to help spread the word of their upcoming releases. As great as it was to read the printed words, the notes and drawings the writers left on each other’s book as they read were just as much fun! (See some examples to the left.) And it got me thinking. Anything that makes reading even more fun just has to be shared, right? Right! Which is also why it would be great if you’d share snapshots of your own Margin Project experiences on this Pinterest page. See what others are reading and writing and get ideas of your own.

(via Author Jen Malone Site | MARGIN PROJECT)

martinaboone:

I’m celebrating two million page views and a lot of other milestones with a ginormous book party at http://www.AdventuresInYAPublishing.com! Win twenty prize packs including thirty-eight different books or series, including wonderful books by Jennifer L. Armentrout, Holly Black, Anne Blankman, Libba Bray, Sarah Rees Brennan, Rae Carson, Kresley Cole, Leah Cypess, Kimberly Derting, Lisa Gail Green, S.E. Green, Wendy Higgins, Rosamund Hodge, Clara Kensie, Kimberley Griffiths Little, Marie Rutkoski, Maggie Stiefvater, Laini Taylor, Kat Zhang and more!
Enter Now

martinaboone:

I’m celebrating two million page views and a lot of other milestones with a ginormous book party at http://www.AdventuresInYAPublishing.com! Win twenty prize packs including thirty-eight different books or series, including wonderful books by Jennifer L. Armentrout, Holly Black, Anne Blankman, Libba Bray, Sarah Rees Brennan, Rae Carson, Kresley Cole, Leah Cypess, Kimberly Derting, Lisa Gail Green, S.E. Green, Wendy Higgins, Rosamund Hodge, Clara Kensie, Kimberley Griffiths Little, Marie Rutkoski, Maggie Stiefvater, Laini Taylor, Kat Zhang and more!

diversityinya:

A Diverse Dozen

Looking for some YA books that just happen to have characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters? Here’s a diverse dozen titles with something for every reader — contemporary, fantasy, science fiction, and mystery too. (Descriptions are from WorldCat.)

Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac (Tu Books) — In a world that has barely survived an apocalypse that leaves it with pre-twentieth century technology, Lozen is a monster hunter for four tyrants who are holding her family hostage.

Pointe by Brandy Colbert (Putnam) — Four years after Theo’s best friend, Donovan, disappeared at age thirteen, he is found and brought home and Theo puts her health at risk as she decides whether to tell the truth about the abductor, knowing her revelation could end her life-long dream of becoming a professional ballet dancer.

If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth (Arthur A. Levine Books) — Seventh-grader Lewis “Shoe” Blake from the Tuscarora Reservation has a new friend, George Haddonfield from the local Air Force base, but in 1975 upstate New York there is a lot of tension and hatred between Native Americans and Whites–and Lewis is not sure that he can rely on friendship.

Fake ID by Lamar Giles (Amistad) — “An African-American teen in the Witness Protection Program moves to a new town and finds himself trying to solve a murder mystery when his first friend is found dead.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han (Simon & Schuster) — Lara Jean writes love letters to all the boys she has loved and then hides them in a hatbox until one day those letters are accidentally sent.

Pantomime by Laura Lam (Strange Chemistry) — Gene, the daughter of a noble family, runs away from the decadence of court to R.H. Ragona’s circus of magic, where she meets runaway Micah, whose blood could unlock the mysteries of the world of Ellada.

Summer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe Garcia McCall (Tu Books) — In an adventure reminiscent of Homer’s Odyssey, fifteen-year-old Odilia and her four younger sisters embark on a journey to return a dead man to his family in Mexico, aided by La Llorona, but impeded by a witch, a warlock, chupacabras, and more.

Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina (Candlewick) — One morning before school, some girl tells Piddy Sanchez that Yaqui Delgado hates her and wants to kick her ass. Piddy doesn’t even know who Yaqui is, never mind what she’s done to piss her off. Word is that Yaqui thinks Piddy is stuck-up, shakes her stuff when she walks, and isn’t Latin enough with her white skin, good grades, and no accent. And Yaqui isn’t kidding around, so Piddy better watch her back. At first Piddy is more concerned with trying to find out more about the father she’s never met and how to balance honors courses with her weekend job at the neighborhood hair salon. But as the harassment escalates, avoiding Yaqui and her gang starts to take over Piddy’s life. Is there any way for Piddy to survive without closing herself off or running away?

Rogue by Lyn Miller-Lachmann (Nancy Paulsen Books) — An eighth-grade girl with Asperger’s syndrome tries to befriend her new neighbor, facing many challenges along the way.

More Than This by Patrick Ness (Candlewick) — A boy named Seth drowns, losing his life as the pounding sea claims him. But then he wakes. He is naked, thirsty, starving. But alive. How is that possible? He remembers dying. So how is he here? And where is this place? It looks like the suburban English town where he lived as a child, before an unthinkable tragedy happened and his family moved to America. But the neighborhood around his old house is overgrown, covered in dust, and completely abandoned. What’s going on? And why is it that whenever he closes his eyes, he falls prey to vivid, agonizing memories that seem more real than the world around him? Seth begins a search for answers, hoping that he might not be alone, trapped in a crumbling, abandoned world.

Prophecy by Ellen Oh (HarperTeen) —A demon slayer, the only female warrior in the King’s army, must battle demon soldiers, an evil shaman, and the Demon Lord to find the lost ruby of the Dragon King’s prophecy and save her kingdom.

Far From You by Tess Sharpe (Hyperion) — After Sophie Winters survives a brutal attack in which her best friend, Mina, is murdered, she sets out to find the killer. At the same time she must prove she is free of her past Oxy addiction and in no way to blame for Mina’s death.

(via yahighway)

katiecotugno:

Oh hey, come hang out!

katiecotugno:

Oh hey, come hang out!

(via sharpegirl)

A starred Kirkus review for OneFour Kidlit author Corinne Duyvis!
“Duyvis smoothly transitions between the two main characters’ thoughts and emotions while realistically conveying the individual alienation and terror of two very different people. Rich worldbuilding, convincing nonheteronormative relationships, balanced class issues, and nuanced, ethnically diverse characters add to the novel’s depth. The well-paced action builds toward an unexpected, thrilling conclusion that will leave readers eager for more from this promising new author. Original and compelling; a stunning debut.” (via OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis | Kirkus)

A starred Kirkus review for OneFour Kidlit author Corinne Duyvis!

“Duyvis smoothly transitions between the two main characters’ thoughts and emotions while realistically conveying the individual alienation and terror of two very different people. Rich worldbuilding, convincing nonheteronormative relationships, balanced class issues, and nuanced, ethnically diverse characters add to the novel’s depth. The well-paced action builds toward an unexpected, thrilling conclusion that will leave readers eager for more from this promising new author. Original and compelling; a stunning debut.”

(via OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis | Kirkus)